HI-TECH NEWS with #camera hashtag

by menarate
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Five years ago Google launched Google Glass – the futuristic gadget developed by Google X division – the company’s intellectual department where engineers develop way-out ideas. Driven by voice commands, Google Glass had quite impressive functionality and was worn by celebrities and featured a fashion show. However there were two problems with it. The first was quite strange design that could make you look like a dork and the second one was the privacy issue. In the end, Google withdrew the device in January 2015.

by Paulite
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You can’t stop gazing at the luminous full moon—you need to share this with Instagram. So you pull out your phone, aim at the heavens, and capture...a fuzzy white blob. The firmament is one of the hardest targets to snap on a phone. Why? A smartphone’s camera lens is wide, and it automatically sets the exposure to capture the dark sky instead of the bright objects in it. To up your phone game, try adding some additional technology. These tips will help you photograph celestial bodies near and far.

Shoot the Moon

Before you adjust the settings on your phone, fix the setting around it. Go to a dark area to avoid light pollution, clean the camera lens with a soft cloth to remove any smudges that might produce a glow effect, and use a tripod and a remote trigger to stabilize the phone. (Did you know you can use your headphone remote to take a photo?) On an iPhone, focus on the moon by tapping on it, and then swipe down to reduce brightness.

Trace Star Trails

As Earth spins on its axis, the stars overhead appear to move in curves. The paths they follow are called star trails. Apps that let you customize your camera settings can take long exposures that will reveal them. The NightCap Pro app is particularly easy to set up because it has “star trails” as a preset mode. As you do for moon photos, minimize light pollution, keep the lens clean, and stabilize the camera.

Capture a Planet

To nab bright planets such as Saturn and Jupiter, snap them on the eyepiece of a telescope and reveal details with stacking software. First, use an app like ProShot or Manual to take multiple photos in RAW format. Then combine the images with a computer program such as Deep Sky Stacker. This works best if you have a mount that holds your smartphone to the scope. Or hack one together with wood, a hose clamp, and some rubber bands.

 

by menarate
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Mars, Jupiter and Saturn are showing themselves at its best this year. As Mars has recently passed its closest point to the Sun, Jupiter is rapidly approaching to the solar opposition thus becoming visible during the whole night. 

by Matar Khalifa
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Amazing Nikon accessories

When it comes to photography there are purists who like to work with as little kit as possible, for fear of too much equipment getting in the way of capturing a scene. Then there are those who like to be equipped for every occasion, poised to deploy any given gadget at the drop of a hat to perfect their pictures.

Here at TechRadar we respect both philosophies, happily offering advice for the best all-in-one compact cameras as well as DSLRs and their myriad accessories.

by menarate
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Another series of great photoshoots was made by Belarusian astronomers in the beginning of June. Being lucky for a good weather and a cloudless sky the enthusiasts caught on their cameras a plenty of the objects including the planets of the Solar System as well as a far space objects.

by menarate
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As summer begins astronomers have discovered a group of unusual sunspots of a size bigger than that of Earth. 

A cluster of sunspots titled AR 2546 was detected on May 22 with a help of telescope Sky Watcher BKP  2008 HEQ5 SynScan PRO and could be visible even with a naked eye when using safelight filters.   

by menarate
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Two Belarusian astrology enthusiasts (Vitaly Hatsuk and Andrei Leichik) have sent us a spectacular time-lapse video with motion of Mercury across the night sky. This planet is considered one of the most difficult planets to observe in the Solar System.

by Ahmed Dubai
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First came the camera. Then the underwater camera. And now, there’s the diving drone camera. As tech continues to reach new heights, we’re exploring new depths of the seas thanks to the iBubble, the gadget that wants to be your autonomous underwater camera.

by AnandaAnatoly
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Dr. Shree Nayar, Director of Columbia University’s Computer Vision Lab, studies the science behind photography. “Wouldn’t it be nice if we had cameras we can wrap around things?” he wondered one day.

by menarate
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Just imagine that more than 2 billion smartphones will be sold across the globe in 2016 and most of them will be bought as a replacement for outdated gadgets. In fact, every fourth person on Earth will use a brand new smartphone! You want to be among them? Then we recommend to consult our list of reasons that will help you to understand whether it is time to change the smart phone or you can wait a little longer.