HI-TECH NEWS with #photography hashtag

by Paulite
Comments: 0

You can’t stop gazing at the luminous full moon—you need to share this with Instagram. So you pull out your phone, aim at the heavens, and capture...a fuzzy white blob. The firmament is one of the hardest targets to snap on a phone. Why? A smartphone’s camera lens is wide, and it automatically sets the exposure to capture the dark sky instead of the bright objects in it. To up your phone game, try adding some additional technology. These tips will help you photograph celestial bodies near and far.

Shoot the Moon

Before you adjust the settings on your phone, fix the setting around it. Go to a dark area to avoid light pollution, clean the camera lens with a soft cloth to remove any smudges that might produce a glow effect, and use a tripod and a remote trigger to stabilize the phone. (Did you know you can use your headphone remote to take a photo?) On an iPhone, focus on the moon by tapping on it, and then swipe down to reduce brightness.

Trace Star Trails

As Earth spins on its axis, the stars overhead appear to move in curves. The paths they follow are called star trails. Apps that let you customize your camera settings can take long exposures that will reveal them. The NightCap Pro app is particularly easy to set up because it has “star trails” as a preset mode. As you do for moon photos, minimize light pollution, keep the lens clean, and stabilize the camera.

Capture a Planet

To nab bright planets such as Saturn and Jupiter, snap them on the eyepiece of a telescope and reveal details with stacking software. First, use an app like ProShot or Manual to take multiple photos in RAW format. Then combine the images with a computer program such as Deep Sky Stacker. This works best if you have a mount that holds your smartphone to the scope. Or hack one together with wood, a hose clamp, and some rubber bands.

 

GoPro unveiled its debut effort in the world of drones by introducing Karma at Photokina 2016. DJI, a long time player in the drone business and famous for its Phantom series of drones, wasn’t going to take this lying down as on Wednesday, it announced the Mavic Pro, foldable drone. The drone will cost $999  and a will begin shipping on October 15 from DJI’s stores and Apple stores, although you can pre-order one starting Wednesday.

by Tom-Link
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Using a ring light or ring flash helps to produce nice, even light across your subject's face. It is an ideal tool for portraiture or close-up work because there are no shadows cast from the light.

However, a traditional ring light or ring flash can be an expensive tool. Here is how you can create a similar effect with tools you hopefully already own.

by Matar Khalifa
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2016 has been a banner year for Nikon since kicking it off with not one, but two professional cameras, the Nikon D500 and Nikon D5. Now the Japanese imaging company is filling out its portfolio with the Nikon D3400, an updated DSLR meant for aspiring shooters.

by Matar Khalifa
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Watching moments unfold though a viewfinder may seem like a narrow, distracted point of view, but a new study suggests otherwise. People who take photos of their experiences actually enjoy them more, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association.

by Matar Khalifa
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The mirrorless or compact system camera category has been growing steadily over the past couple of years, and for good reason. These cameras DSLR levels of functionality and quality (depending on the sensor being used) in a compact body that's relatively easy to carry around. Sony has been enjoying a fair bit of success in this category ever since it announced its A6000 interchangeable lens mirrorless camera nearly two years ago. This particular model has been revered by many as the go-to compact camera for action stills and video.

by Smartmon
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In this day and age, with smartphones and selfie sticks, it seems like everyone is a photographer. If you ask most people, they would probably say they could tell the difference between a professional photographer and someone just claiming to be one. But, could you really?

by AnandaAnatoly
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Snapchat's "face swap" feature, which lets users swap faces with someone (orsomething) else in real time, is so popular (and unsettling) that it has become something of a meme. Now a new update that was pushed to the iOS App Store yesterday adds a whole new layer to the feature, allowing people to swap faces with images stored on their phone's camera roll.

by Paulite
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From the time the selfie virus has hit us all, clicking pictures has never been easier. Candid shots, cosy clicks and family portraits have all become easier to take or manage, thanks to the advent of the smartphone and compact cameras. However, more often than not, we tend to click multiple images of the same shot so as to zero in on one best click. And naturally, this best click makes it to our social media account, profiles and so many other places.

by CrinetJanet
Comments: 3

Last week, we were blown away by a photograph from Mike Mezeul II depicting a storm over White Sands National Monument. We looked in a bit more on Mezeul’s portfolio and were amazed at what we saw.