HI-TECH NEWS with #science hashtag

by Ahmed Dubai
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The dark art of search engine optimization could be next in line for software-powered automation — potentially putting hundreds of thousands of ‘SEO consultants’ out of a job.

At least that’s the scenario sketched by RankScience, a YC-backed startup just graduating from accelerator’s winter 2017 program, whose software-as-a-service automates the process of running thousands of A/B tests in order to identify which changes will improve the Google ranking of customer webpages in organic search results.

by Matar Khalifa
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Once upon a time, you were falling in love. Now you’re only falling apart. There’s nothing you can do. There’s going to be a total solar eclipse in 2017, but not of the heart. Of the sun. Because, you know, it’s a solar eclipse.

With a temperature below -268 degrees Celsius, liquid helium keeps MRI machines and particle accelerators properly cooled (yay!). Take liquid helium's temperature even lower than that, however, and things start to get a little less practical -- and a lot more weird.

by Paulite
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NASA has an enormous repository of research papers in its possession, but it’s never exactly been easy to wade through all of them in the past few years. That’s why NASA has gone forward with a new web portal that will allow you to look through its research results in a much more expedient and simplified manner.

With a temperature below -268 degrees Celsius, liquid helium keeps MRI machines and particle accelerators properly cooled (yay!). Take liquid helium's temperature even lower than that, however, and things start to get a little less practical -- and a lot more weird.

The first Nobel Prize of 2016 has been awarded to Japanese biologist Yoshinori Ohsumi for his work looking into the inner workings of cells.

Specifically, the award was given to Ohsumi in recognition of his work in the early 1990's looking into the autophagy of cells. Autophagy is a word meaning self-eating, and refers to the process by which cells can break down damaged or less useful components and turn them into building blocks or food for other parts of the cell.

You may have heard of neutrinos: the tiny subatomic space particles found throughout our galaxy, which pass through our bodies in their tens of thousands every single second. Formed in the first seconds of the universe, before even atoms, they are also continually created by nuclear reactions, such as those which take place in the sun.

by Paulite
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Teenage rebellion takes many forms. Some of us get dumb haircuts or listen to some truly terrible music. But for the amateur scientist, breaking your mother’s heart* involves diethyl ether and the family pool.

The thing about deithyl ether is that it’s really, REALLY flammable. And it floats on water. So The Backyard Scientist set out to determine if said fire could lit in a swimming pool, and then be extinguished by liquid nitrogen. Because liquid nitrogen also floats on top of water it creates an oxygen barrier that puts out the raging flames. For a bonus experiment he also attempts the same feat but with dry ice instead of liquid nitrogen. Granted, he also briefly sets his hand of fire in the process.

by Tom-Link
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When we gaze up at a tree full of lush, green leaves we are actually looking at hundreds of tiny batteries. These tiny appendages save energy for the tree to use at a later time, a natural process scientists have harnessed to create literal leaf batteries as eco-friendly alternatives to the lithium powerhouses of today.

For as much as would-be academics like to tout their "love of learning," the actual act of learning a new skill kind of sucks. The journey has its moments, obviously, but it's no fun watching someone shred a guitar while you're still only good for a few chords after a month of practice. But according to scientists at HRL Laboratories, there may be a "hack," of sorts: Using low-current electrical brain stimulation, they're able to hasten and improve the learning process. It is, to date, the closest anyone's come to recreating the "knowledge uploads" depicted in The Matrix.