HI-TECH NEWS with #security hashtag

by AnandaAnatoly
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Hey, guys! So… Yahoo! has something they want to tell you. Something they probably should’ve told you two years ago, really. Data from more than 500 million of their users was stolen in 2014.

We’ve seen some big incidents over the years, but half a billion users? That’s one for the record books. On a good note, Yahoo! is finally number one at something again, and, hey, they still had more than 500,000,000 accounts on the books as of 2014.

Everywhere you go on the web, trackers are working to reconstruct your every move. But who tracks the trackers? That’s just what researchers at the University of Washington are doing, with purpose-built tools and liberal use of Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine.

Software vulnerabilities in mobile devices are hardly an infrequent discovery nowadays — a recent report by researchers at NowSecure found that a quarter of mobile apps contain “at least one” high-risk security flaw — but it’s rare that one affects a broad swath of devices. But that’s just what Israeli cybersecurity firm Check Point detailed at the Defcon security conference in Las Vegas last week: a new bug, dubbed “Quadrooter,” that resides within the firmware of a Qualcomm chip contained in more than 900 million devices.

by Smartmon
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Today when you step out, you will surely come across many public wifi hotspots. And come on, who doesn’t love free wifi on the go? But you need to beware of the risks involved. Read on to know all about using free public wifi!

by Paulite
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Think CAPTCHAs are annoying? Imagine how bad they are for the blind.

Try as designers might, there hasn’t ever been a really solid solution for the visually impaired to prove that they’re human. Such CAPTCHAs (Completely Automated Public Turing Test To Tell Computers and Humans Apart) are either too difficult to solve, or too easy for bots to figure out. But researchers at Ruhr-Universitaet-Bochum might have a solution. A number of words are read out loud by a computer, alongside some gibberish; users need to identify the gibberish. It sounds simple, but bots struggle with it, Phys.org is reporting.

by Smartmon
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Given that we have had internet for decades now, but the passwords have barely evolved along with our broadband speeds. SplashData's annual list compiles the millions of stolen passwords made public throughout the year, and assembles them in order of popularity.

by Ahmed Dubai
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A research team from the University of Michigan and Microsoft Research has discovered a vulnerability in Samsung's SmartThings platform that can allow attackers to perform unauthorised activities through a malicious app. The vulnerability is major considering that it can allow an attacker to control a broad range of personal devices under SmartThings such as motion sensors, fire alarms, and door locks.

by Smartmon
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In April 2004, Bill Gates predicted the death of passwords. More than ten years later, their end is a more current topic than ever, and many technology brands are seeking a replacement for them. The reason is that passwords pose some problems, such as the authentication method for each user: paradoxically, the safer passwords are, the easier they are to forget. And conversely, the easier they are to remember, the less secure they usually are.

Google is known to be one of the best search engines among all, where you can find all sorts of information. The Internet has a vast storage of information ranging from good to bad and most of the parents do not like their child to get addicted to the bad stuff out there! Keeping this in mind, Google has recently launched a safe search option for kids called Kiddle. The Kiddle search engine is a free service that can offer peace of mind to the parents.

by JASELINEte
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Sorry Mac fans -- now you're no better off than regular old PC users.

Security researchers have discovered what they believe to be the first ever ransomware attack targeted at Apple users that actually made it out 'into the wild.' And in bad news for downloading fiends, it's being spread through torrenting software.